05/12/2019No Comments

Idea // A/B Testing though the magic of CGI

A/B testing is nothing new. You give folk two (or more) options, and see how they react. You then have a good idea which one version to push to your customers, clients or users.

cgi a/b testing illustration 3d visualisation

Icons made by prettycons from www.flaticon.com

 

Digital A/B testing is often used when designing and running websites, advertising and marketing campaigns.

Take web design for example, you have 2 designs but you don't know which perform the best. So you create 2 websites, and 2 groups of users. You then measure the performance of the websites, and go with the strongest website.

Smart right.

 

Well why not do the same with CGI illustrations. Create 2 versions of the same product and see which one gets the best reaction. 

cgi a/b testing illustration 3d visualisation

And the beauty of using CGI is that the product doesn't even have to exist, and doesn't have to until you know which one will sell.

Super smart right?

cgi a/b testing illustration 3d visualisation animated

By using CGI and digital mediums wisely, you could gain a real advantage over the industry, be more resourceful, and better serve your customers.

The phrase "knowledge is power" has never been so relevant as it is right now, and with A/B testing you can build that knowledge.

cgi a/b testing illustration 3d visualisation

So to prove a point, we're going to run a test soon. We'll take a product, create 2 variations, and see which one gets the most interaction on a platform like Instagram.

And we'll of course post our results!

 

Until then, take it easy, and if you'd like to know more about A/B testing, CGI or anything else, then drop us a line. Details on the contact page.

Thanks,
Dean

22/10/2015No Comments

Stock and Custom 3D models in CGI Visualisations

Throughout my CGI work, the scenes I create will be primarily populated with the building or product, but to set the scene props, landscapes, entourage, etc are added. These items, big or small have to be created and added to the 3D scenes.

Sometimes we use stock 3D models, which are very similar to stock photography. There are websites where you can download a wide variety of 3D models ranging from costing nowt, to hundreds of pounds. Once downloaded, the 3D models can be dropped into a virtual scene and used within the visualisation or animation.

With the majority of my projects I will 3D modelling various parts of a scene. In architectural visualisations I will model the buildings, landscape and other items, then populate the scene with stock library items such as cars and trees. I do this simply because the stock models available for foliage and vehicles is pretty extensive, and it would be counter-productive for me to start modelling these items, which could make the final cost of the CGIs too expensive for many. A collection of 10 cars can be purchased for a few hundred pounds, where as for myself to 3D model just one car would take at least a week, which makes a typical architectural visualisation just too expensive and time consuming.

architecture_nb_shot_2_final_1600Stock foliage used within a custom 3D modelled environment.

With interior visualisations and digital room sets, I find myself using less stock 3D model, in favour of hand creating custom items. My preference to do this has many factors.

  1. Trends within interior design changes on a monthly basis, and as such many of the stock 3D items are dated, and have sometimes been created years ago. This is OK for the design classics, but for items that change with the seasons it's not ideal, and can really impact on the final image.
  2. I can create almost any item in 3D, without it impacting on project costs or time too much. 3D modelling can be very tricky, and getting items to look realistic can also be hard, if not impossible for some, however when I started in the CGI industry over a decade ago (ouch), my speciality was 3D modelling, and doing it fast and good! Over the years I have continued to build on this core skill, evolving processes with every year, taking advantage of new techniques and software to be able to quickly create virtually anything.
  3. Purchasing 3D models from stock sites isn't always straight forward, first you have to find the right model, at a good price (I am a Yorkshireman after all!), and then trust it's OK to use. Then once I've bought the models, approximately 50% of the time the 3D models will need adjustments such as re-scaling or fixing errors, and nearly every time I need to check the 3D model material finishes to be in-line with my techniques and processes. This can be time consuming, and could also become costly.
  4. If I create the 3D models from scratch, I know the models are good, correct and error free. Maybe I'm not very trusting, or perhaps I just have faith in my own skills! Either way I know when I've 3D modelled an item that it's going to look good in the image, and if it doesn't look quite right, I know how to break it apart and improve it.
  5. The final advantage of creating custom 3D items is that they belong to me! I will add items to my personal library for future use, and I will also re-sell the 3D models though my TurboSquid account to other folk. I must admit I don't receive much in the way of sales, but it pays for my dropbox account at least!

Franke Sink Tap 3D Model CGI Kitchen

Franke sink and tap created from a handful of photos and dimensions.

Franke Sink Tap 3D Model CGI KitchenA wire-frame shot showing the 3D construction.

Although creating the 3D models from scratch has it's advantages, it also has its disadvantages. Some items can be very difficult to re-create in 3D. Items such as cloth, plants, and other organic forms can be tricky, so much so that it's not uncommon for these type of items to be photographed in the studio, and super-imposed into the CGI in post-production. This is purely a time-saving technique, anything can be created in 3D, it's generally a matter of how much time is available to complete a job.

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Dualit toaster, available to buy on TurboSquid

Other disadvantages could be that an items has little information or imagery to create an accurate 3D model. For example it's quite rare to find a piece of furniture photographed from every angle, instead usually the only reference is an angled photo, and generally the photograph will be of medium - low quality or resolution. So to create the furniture does require some educated guess work, and as such can't be too accurate. Clients will sometimes be able to physically send items to be turned into 3D models, which means a greater accuracy can be achieved, and is generally the only way to be certain of getting the 3D model just right.

Although I do find creating 3D models from scratch very useful, sometimes I do purchase 3D models. For interior room sets, I will often pick items from Design Connected, and occasionally TurboSquid and 90% of the time I'll be happy with the purchases. Purchasing these type of models will help speed up the process, which is very useful on projects where time is limited.

Both buying and creating 3D models has its advantages and disadvantages, and the majority of the time the decision to buy or make is made on a project by project case. As I've mentioned cost and time are two factors, however if possible I will always aim to use items I've created myself, this ultimately helps keep my work fresh, up to date and unique.

Dean

11/06/2015No Comments

May Design 2015 – Personal Highlight – Randonneur Chair

Last month I visited May Design by the London Docklands, and what a cracking exhibition it was. I had never been before, and although I had read the website and see the previews, I wasn't entirely sure what to expect. True to its website, there was a mix of furniture, interiors, kitchen, bathroom, fabrics, and much more.

I found so much inspiration from all areas of the exhibition, and met many people, but one piece which really stood out for me was the Randonneur Chair.

randonneur-chair-1

I stumbled across this fantastic retro cycle inspired rocking chair in the new designers area, surrounded by other great new pieces I must say. The chair is unlike any rocking chair I have seen, and perhaps with my recent interest in cycling (I ditched the car for a cycle over a year ago to commute), I was drawn to this chair like a magpie to something shiny! Saying that though, it isn't that shiny, it's much softer, and inviting. The mixture of fabrics, wood and metal (Reynolds 631 tubing, as used on cycles) compliment each other brilliantly, it really is a thing of beauty!

randonneur_chair-1

The curved handle bars are the most obvious reference to the bicycle, as are the bottle holders, however once you examine the form you'll see more similarities with the bicycle. The front "leg" of the chair, and the two connecting bars are directly inspired from the cycles front frame and forks. Also the leather bag on the rear of the seat could easily be a retro style saddle bag.

randonneur-chair-2-1

The attention to detail on this chair is amazing, and really has to been seen to fully appreciate the craftsmanship in creating a chair like this. Sadly I didn't get the chance to sit in the chair, but perhaps, as with many great chairs, you could sit in it, but it's far better to stand and simply view the chair as a work of art.

Please head over to www.twomakers.co.uk to know more about this chair, and the two guys behind it!

 

I'm off for a ride,

Dean

05/06/2015No Comments

Interactive Configurator Launched

Over the past few months, I have been working with a web development team to create a new interactive application, which utilises the flexibility of CGI with some web programming magic. We wanted to create an application to allow users to interactively configure anything, then share, save or print their configuration.

The application has been given it's own brand new website, check out www.constructandconfigure.com to see what all the fuss is about, and to play with the two demo applications.

The application is a "configurator" and has been designed to enable users to change finishes, features and other options by clicking on buttons to access menus. In the kitchen demo, the user can change the kitchen finish, the door handles and the worktops, but almost any visual element of a product, space or architecture could be configurable. In the kitchen demo we could if we wanted to add the ability to change the appliances, the stools, or even the floor and wall finishes. This is one reason why using 3D is great, we can create these CGI variations quickly, store them digitally, and present them in a way which is quick and easy for the end users to see.

The interactive kitchen demo application.

The application has been designed to work on most modern devices, PCs, laptops, tablets, smart phones, iPads and anything else with a modern web browser and a reasonably fast internet connection. We wanted to make the application accessible to as many people as possible, so it made sense to make the application run inside a web browser, without the need for any software downloads.

As standard, we have added 3 features to the app, save, print and share. The save button will download an image, overlaid with a description of the configuration, to your device. The print function simply prints the configuration, and again with a description so you know exactly the chosen configuration. The share button is perhaps the most complex function, but something we felt was required to allow users to share their configuration quickly and easily. When the user clicks the share button, a pop up window is displayed with a unique web address. The user can then highlight, copy and paste this address to Twitter, Facebook, email or anything else. When the address this then re-opened in a web browser, the users configuration is displayed. For this app we wanted to avoid user log-ins and passwords as we wanted the experience to be fast and user friendly, and using a unique web address works perfectly.

The app works on touch screen devices, as well as a traditional mouse.

We see this app to be primarily used to visualise and configure products. A sales team could use the application to show potential buyers the various configurations of their product, which may help the buyers visualise their potential purchase, and hopefully secure a sale. Similarly the app could be used in show rooms, where it's physically impossible to show all the product variations, but with the app customers could quickly and easily see any configuration they wish.

The application could be used by housing developers to show potential house buyers their new home, and then allow them to choose fixtures and finishes, which many house builders now allow. The possibilities for the app is limitless!

Use the app on the go, but be careful using it on 3G or 4G as data charges may occur!

The application has been fully custom made to suit our requirements. We did this for one important reason, we can modify, change, or add features to the application when required. The application is web based, and with the advances in HTML 5, more and more is possible. As an example we could add a clip board, user log-in, or even link the app with an e-commerce website allowing the users to purchase directly from the app.

View the configurator anywhere.

Currently the configurator doesn't allow the user to build products, they can't alter the kitchen layout for example, but this isn't why we created this application. In order to visualise the products in a photo realistic manor, the app uses pre-rendered CGI images, layered on top of each other to create the users configuration. Advances in real-time visualisation has shown we can create almost photo-real visuals using technology such as Unity 3D or the Unreal game engine, however using this kind of software means the users have to download plugins or software suitable for their device, which is something we didn't want to do. In the future I'm sure this will change, but for now we believe our current approach is the best way!

So head over to http://www.constructandconfigure.com and play with the application demos.

If you have any questions or comments about the configurator, please get in touch!

Dean

08/05/2015No Comments

3D Interactive Furniture Demo 02

In-between projects I continue to tinker and play with new tech, software, and areas of interest. Usually these side-projects are different from the typical 9-5 projects, but allow myself to look, play and develop new technology and ideas.

Anyway, following on from 3D interactive test 01, this latest revision shows some changes, mainly the inclusion of drop-down menus, and a new way of rotating around the object (the user now clicks and holds down the left mouse button, then moves the mouse) is much nicer to use.

At this stage of development, the main purpose of these demos is to build functionality, hence the very standard looking menus, but once the functions and workings of the app are working, adding the finer detail and visual elements is the easier part (in theory!).

Launch 3D Interactive Furniture Demo 02

3D_Furniture_Interactive_Test_02

The app is built with Unity 3D, which very knidly allows the app to also install and run on mobile devices as well as the web. An augmented reality version is also being developed which I will record very soon to show.

Any comments, please let me know!

Dean

25/03/2015No Comments

3D Interactive Furniture Demo 01

Recently Unity3D (a fantastic piece of software to create interactive projects and games) became free, along with features such as real-time lighting, and fancy materials.

I've wanted to have a play with Unity3D for a while, so during a bit of downtime I opened it up and created a quick test project to experiment with and play....

Launch 3D Interactive Furniture Demo 01

3D Interactive FurnitureA screen grab from the demo.

At the moment, to change the furniture style, press buttons 1, 2, 3, 4, and use your mouse to rotate around the chair, and the mouse wheel to zoom in and out.

The next stage is to add buttons (some programming needed, which I know very little of!), and to also give options to change colours of parts of the furniture. The app can then be ported to tablets, phones, desktops, as well as websites.

Currently the 3D Interactive Furniture Demo is a very basic demo, only really scratching the surface of what is possible.

24/03/2015No Comments

Digital Room Sets Will Never Be Built

"Digital room sets will never be built."

This is a realisation I had whilst working on a current digital room set project, and it's not something I've ever thought about before. With architectural visualisations and product CGIs, the purpose of a 3D visualisation is to preview or to sell something, that one day will become real. A CGI of a building is pretty good representation of how the end architecture will look, and so estate agents can sell the house before it's built. The same goes for products. These things will be built, and I love seeing the real thing, and then comparing the digital to the real.

Room sets though will never be built. The products that sit in the digital rooms may one day be manufactured and sold, some might even be available now, but the room will never exist, and it's almost certain to say that the exact configuration of a kitchen or bedroom shown within a CGI is very unlikely to be exactly replicated.

Digital room sets are entirely 3D polygons, computer generated textures, and simulated lighting. Wooden beams, or a stone chimney breast are only pixels, with little consideration is often made to whether these architectural features would be strong enough, durable, or even possible in reality. So long as they look correct and give the impression of realism, then that's usually as far as the design will go.

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An alpine digital room set to visualise bi-folding door.

By removing the need for these room sets to be built, we can allow ourselves to build digital room sets which might not exist in reality. The 3D room set used in the Student Mattress Room Set Project doesn't exist in reality, but it could. However by removing the constraint of the room needing to the accurate, strong, and true to technical aspects such as building regulations, the temptation can be to create something un-realistic.

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A student digital room set created to visualise a new mattress.

With 3D there are no size or design constraints, we can make rooms as large, unusual, wacky as we feel. This can sometimes be a mistake. For example, with the student room set, we could have easily made the set 10m wide, with elaborate architectural detail, modern furniture, and so on, but it would have quickly not looked like a student room at all. Yes the furniture we added is slightly unusual, and the room is perhaps more elaborate that the student rooms I remember from my University days, but it's still believable, it could be made like this. I believe this balancing act is key to creating a great interior digital room set. Realistic 3D models, materials and lighting only work well if the design and architecture is spot on to begin with. As I've said already, structural and other constraints don't apply in 3D CGI projects a literal sense, but they do apply in a believable sense.

There is the other side of the coin with to the lack of constraints, and this is we as artists and designers have total freedom to create what we want. If you want to show your product on the edge of a volcano, or even on the moon, then CGI and 3D magic can make these possible, at a tiny fraction of the cost of doing it in real life.

Digital room sets can also be stored away on tiny hard drives, archived for later use, amends, or new products. There's no need to de-construct the set, and there are no time limits on how long a set can stay constructed for. Digital room sets can also be quickly changed, re-styled, and given a new look very quickly. Check out the interactive applications over at the interactive page to see more about how interactive applications can be used in conjunction with digital room sets.

Anyway, I'm straying from my original point slightly. To the average viewer, a digital room set may look no different to a traditional, photographed room set, and I guess that's why digital room sets prove popular with clients and customers. My point is that for all the design, styling and virtual construction work, the sets are merely polygons and pixels, and will never be built, touched or experienced in the real world.

 

Digital room sets will never be built....

....and this makes me sad....

....but I think I'll be OK!

 

Dean

02/04/2014No Comments

2D Photo to 3D Virtual Model to 3D Physical Print

3D model libraries exist to allow digital artists to quickly populate their scenes with appropriate content. Using libraries for 3D models can be a time saver, and as such saves money and costs. But what happens when a specific model cannot be found in any library? This can happen quite often, perhaps an architect would like a particular bench outside their building, or an interior designer would like to see a specific item of furniture in their lounge.

The solution is to build the 3D models manually. Using as much information as possible, the 3D artist can turn drawings, dimensions and other references into 3D models. The accuracy of the 3D models is highly dependant on what information can be found. If the item to be modelled can be physically held, studied and measured, then the model will be more accurate than a model created from a handful of photos.

In a recent project I was asked to model the Dark Cross Dining chair.

Black Cross Dining Chair

From the website, we have the above image, and some basic dimensions, and that's all! However from this one image and the measurements I can re-create the chair in 3D. I also used the image to measure the leg thickness, the proportions of the chair, and overall shape and size of various parts. There are some assumptions I made, such as the seat height is similar to a standard dining chair, the chair is symmetrical and the legs are circular. I had to guess other areas, such as the rear of the chair, the curve of the top bar and the shape of the seat.

3D Dining Chair Wireframe

This image shows how the chair is built in 3D. Keeping models simple, and adding detail where needed is my philosophy, and this is evident in this 3D chair. Techniques can be then applied to the model to turn the faceted geometry into smooth curves.

Generally the 3D model would then have textures and materially applied, and rendered inside a scene. This model was created for a client, who only required the 3D model without materials.

I then decided to take this model and use it as a test for 3D printing. The chair didn't require many changes to make the chair printable, however some models will require more work. When creating 3D models for visualisations, the artist will often not model parts which aren't seen, such as the bottom of the chair as this is deemed as unnecessary and time consuming, however with 3D printing, all areas of the model need to be created. Also when 3D printing models, the model needs to meet a certain specification depending of the type of 3D printer that will be used. Some printers require a minimum part thickness of 1mm, so in the case of this chair, when it was scaled to 1/1o the cross detail was thinner than 1mm, so this had to be made thicker.

Once the 3D model is complete, the 3D chair model is then sent to a 3D printing company. There are several companies, all differing in difference services and price. The one I chose to use this time was 3D Print UK. I chose to use them as their pricing is different to other 3D printing companies, as they price on the overall dimension of the 3D model, rather than volume, and as I wanted to print several items (more blog posts to follow) the overall price was better than printing each model separately.

So the 3D models were sent away, and 2 weeks later a little parcel arrived containing the prints....

3D Printed Dining Chair

3D Printed Dining Chair

The prints really exceeded my expectations, the level of detail is much better than I had expected, and the strength of the prints are good too. I wasn't sure if the little fixings would be printed, as they are slightly smaller than the minimum specification, but they are still visible.

3D Printed Dining Chair

The finish of the white nylon print is an interesting finish. To touch it feels like an Extra Strong Mint, and visually it does too. The nylon material which the models are printed with is also quite easy to mark, and can also leave little powdery marks on skin and anything else it comes into contact with, although I presume this is left from the printing process, and any loose nylon powder is soon discarded.

I ordered 2 chairs, so I could try painting and finishing a chair.

3D Printed Dining Chair

3D Printed Dining Chair

The finishing of the brown chair was done using Humbrol Airfix paints, but with nylon prints almost any type of finishing can be used. The 3D Print UK site demonstrates using aerosol paints to finish the 3D prints.

Painting and finishing the models is important with nylon prints, not only to add detail, but also to protect the prints from dirt and marks. Even if a white finish is desired, I would still use a clear finish.

3D printing is something I've always been fascinated with, and printing these chairs has only made me more intrigued and more sure that 3D printing will play a huge roll in the very near future. The quality of the prints is very good, perhaps not as detailed as traditional model making processes, but if you consider the lack of tooling needed, and the individuality 3D printing offers then 3D printing is a very viable solution, especially for one-off items, or for rapid prototyping.

The main downside with 3D printing using external companies is the lead time, which in my experience is around 2 weeks. This is still very good, however I see 3D printing as something that could be incredibly useful for rapid prototyping, testing ideas, and playing with concepts.

The other downside is price, £100 doesn't print a lot, and could soon become costly if several iterations of a model were printed. For myself, I see these external print companies useful for finished 3D models, and I plan to purchase a desktop 3D printer for testing and prototyping. Watch this space......

16/01/2014No Comments

Inspiration: Small spaces

I think I've always be inspired by small, clever design. I've never been the type of person who thinks bigger is better, I drive a small car, live in a small house, and of course live in the UK, where space is always at a premium.

I find small spaces very inspiring, and this inspiration literally comes in all shapes and sizes. Recently I have found myself being fascinated by incredibly clever and beautiful design that utilises very small spaces. I love the constraints of small spaces, and the challenges they give. Living in a small house perhaps give me a personal connection, and a need to learn and be excited by how others have developed small spaces.

Designing for large spaces where space plentiful is still a great challenge, but when a small space needs to be functional as well as look good, then it becomes very tricky, but very interesting. I love these small spaces and the thought and design that been put into them, from the hidden storage, to the flexible living spaces. Every inch is treasured, and none is wasted.

 

900x600x130811_084143_je_3056-jpg-pagespeed-ic_-wlwfbpvyxr

www.hankboughtabus.com is something I stumbled across a few months ago, and was immediately in awe of. From the outside it looks like a classic America school bus, but when viewing the inside you can the incredible transformation of spaced achieved by Hank. The converted bus is used as a mobile home and a base for a road trip.

 

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Instead of Hank designing a huge building for his final year project, he instead set about creating a design that he could create, build and actually make use of.

One of the reasons I love this space, is the unexpected. From outside you would never expect to see what lies behind the windows. The external metal shell of the bus is still complete, but the inside is where the transformation to modern, warm and homely design happens.  The simple and straight forward design gives a very functional, rather than a design classic feel, however in using simple, but beautiful materials, the design has it's own unique beauty. I personally love the curved ceiling, the way the arch disappears behind the horizontal panel is fantastic, and I love that there are no visible fixings holding the ceiling in place. Perhaps for some, it will be a step too far towards the function over form, but for me it strikes a good balance, and perhaps you can see where a limited budget has left its mark, but in saying that, if Hank had been more elaborate and intricate, then I'm sure a lot of the buses charm would be lost.

The other part of the design I also love is how Hank has made the layout as flexible as possible. The beds, seats and other furniture are all easily manoeuvrable so the spaces can be re-jigged to suit individual needs, and can also be easily transformed for different functions too.

 

Another source of inspiration for me is "George Clark's Amazing Spaces" TV show.

Again, like Hank's bus, the spaces shown in this TV show are small, in some cases much smaller than the bus, but equally they are beautiful small spaces. The projects range from beach huts to modular pre-fab buildings, like the one shown below.

case-study-720x480

Throughout the series, many different projects are explored, but the project which connects each TV show is George Clarke's caravan. The series documents the conversion of a tired and dated 1979 static holiday caravan into a desirable, modern holiday home for a family of 5!

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The caravan features some very clever design, such as the way the outside wall of the caravan folds down to create an external decked area, but perhaps the most inspiring use of space in my opinion comes from the way the the sleeping space has been designed. In a space barely large enough for a double bed, a total of 4 beds (1 double, 3 singles) have been squeezed and manipulated into the tiny space. To see how this is possible, you should check out Episode 6 on 4OD.

When working with CG projects, it's very easy to lose all sense of scale. The digital worlds in which I work can be infinitely large, which can literally means any thing is possible. Sometimes it's good to take a step back and give yourself some constraints, and by doing so it means you think more intelligently about the space or design, and you often find this makes projects more interesting and beautiful. This is especially true with interior visualisations, sometimes the easiest option is to create a room so large we can literally fit anything in we want, but this just doesn't happen in the real world, and views of the image or animation will notice this and won't connect with the images. Instead, using a realistic scaled room, beautifully designed and well planned, will engage and draw viewers in.

I could be talking nonsense, but that's my theory anyway!

Dean

19/03/2012No Comments

Turbosquid account goes live!

I published my first collection of models onto my TurboSquid account this morning!

www.turbosquid.com/Search/Artists/Ard-Digital

Feel free to check out my

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models, and perhaps purchase a few!

Deano

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