13/05/2019No Comments

Punch Infinity // Interactive Configurator Survey

Punch Infinity // Interactive Configurator Survey

The Punch Infinity Survey is live, but we need your help!

Have you ever used an Interactive Configurator? Whether you use them on a daily basis or have no idea what I'm talking about, can you spare a few moments to fill out our survey to help us design the future.

First visit....

https://www.punch.digital/punch-infinity

and try out one or more demos on 1 (preferably more) devices.

Once you’ve done then, crack on with the survey (Click to launch)

 

It’ll take around 5 mins, and you’ll really be helping us out!

Plus you could win a £50 Amazon voucher to spend on junk you don't need!

The survey will run for a few weeks. Results will be published, and folk who complete the form will be entered into a prize draw for a £50 Amazon voucher!

Contact us by email, dm or good old telephone.

14/06/2016No Comments

Virtual Reality is here!

Virtual reality is here, and there's no hiding from it!

As we all know, the tech world doesn't stand still, new devices and innovations are constantly being brought to the market place, and it's very easy to become overwhelmed by the constant stream of new tech. However one area of technology we're very keen to get our hands dirty with is Virtual Reality!

Virtual Reality Headset VR 3D

For those who are less acquainted with the concept, virtual reality is essentially a way to immerse yourself in digital environments and content, via a wearable headset. In the past, the term "virtual reality" has been used for numerous 3D based ideas, such as interactive walk-thoughs, but it is now being commonly used in context with the headsets.

Anyway, why are we excited by it? Well firstly we love new tech! And secondly I believe this is a step towards fully 3D content for everyone. 3D TVs came and have almost gone (fantastic!), and virtual reality should be the next big thing.

There are many headsets on the market now, such as the HTC Vive and Oculus Rift, but the one we have gone for is the Gear VR. Out of those 3 we have perhaps chosen the least powerful, weaker graphics, and not quite the cheapest even, but what it does have is the ability to go anywhere, it's fully mobile, literally.

The Gear VR is essentially a Samsung smart phone (ours is the Galaxy S7), coupled together with the gear VR headset. The viewer inserts their phone into the headset, and straps on the Gear VR, and they are immersed into Virtual Reality! The HTC Vive and Oculus Rift both need to be connected to a powerful PC, for which gaming is a must, but we feel this limitation will be a huge sticking point for a lot of casual users.

Virtual Reality Headset VR 3D Samsung Gear

The Gear VR Headset.

Most people now have smart phones, and just about any modern Android phone can be turned into a virtual reality headset with either the Gear VR or Google Cardboard, and I'm sure the likes of Apple and Microsoft won't be too long in releasing their own versions.

So what can you do with a virtual reality headset? The easiest, and perhaps one of the most interesting things to do is go and watch some amazing 360 videos. Youtube, Facebook and others now host 360. There are also 100s of apps and games to play and use, from simply watching Netflix in virtual reality, to engaging, playing and meeting people in virtual social worlds; even Facebook has plans to turn their social network into a VR experience!

But what about what we plan to do with VR and the Samsung Gear? Firstly we're going to have some fun! We're going to fire up some VR apps, watch some 360 videos, and research (yes researching can be fun!), and we'll see what grabs us, and what doesn't. There's no point in diving straight in and producing content that either doesn't work, doesn't engage, or isn't useful.

After that we'll know more about the direction we want to go in. At the moment we see two paths, 360 video, and interactive environments. 360 video is become quite well established, with YouTube and Facebook both supporting 360 videos natively inside a web browser (essentially all you do is load the page, and the video will play, so no need for any software downloads). 360 videos are relatively straight forward to create, similar in a way a CGI image or animation is created, however ensuring the user is engaged, entertained and even guided by the content will be just as important as the content itself.

Interactive environments and worlds are more complex to create, and are quite comparable to computer gaming and interactive walk-thoughts. An entire environment is created, and the user can play, explore or even learn through interacting with the virtual content. How the user interacts depends purely on how the game or app is created. With some apps you can look at an object, and press the button on the side of the headset to "click" the object, and other you may need a gaming controller to move easily though the world.

Both 360 videos and interactive environments have their pros and cons, and as I've already mentioned, once we've done our research and had chance to digest what we think works and what doesn't, we'll then start to take steps to produce demos and really get our hands dirty!

For now, all I can say is we're excited and really can't wait to get stuck in and start creating brilliant VR experiences!

Dean

08/01/2016No Comments

Virtual Reality Aids Nasa Training

It's of no real surprise that massive organisations such as NASA are using virtual reality to help test, train and develop their environments and users, in fact you'd expect them to be the leaders in new tech, and demoing things which we hadn't even heard of.

So when I saw this short video, showing a user controlling a robotic arm to simulate lag in a zero gravity environment, I was a little surprised to see them using an off-the-shelf Sony VR headset (Project Morpheus), which will be available to buy in 2016, presumably to be primarily used with the Playstation 4.

For myself, this is quite a big deal, the virtual reality headset will probably be priced at around £500, and to consumers who only want to play games this may seem high and hard to justify, but if you think about it, the price is much lower than a new TV, and will likely give you a much more immersive experience than a TV or monitor.

Playing games is one thing, and ultimately gaming has really driven this technology to this level, but what about the other possibilities for this kind of hardware?

Of course we can look to use the headsets for interactive architectural walk-through, or to visualise new products in full 3D, and I'm sure we'll see an increase in demand for these types of projects. Selling a housing development "off-plan" may be replaced by selling "off-VR", allowing potential buyers to walk around their future neighbourhood, and explore their future home.

 vr_head_set_nasa_training_virtual_reality_02The VR headset and controllers in action.

However I also see a massive use for VR in development, simulation, testing and training, which is what the video explores. Again architecture and product design may find virtual reality useful to develop and preview architecture and prototypes, uncovering potential design flaws, or perhaps even for user testing and focus groups, which could potentially mean architects and designers could trial several designs in a much more cost effective manor.

Training and simulation could also be a great use for virtual reality. As the video shows, the software can be programmed to different scenarios for any environment. A factory could be tested before it's built, and any design flaws could be rectified before actual construction of the building, saving companies a huge amount of money and time.

vr_head_set_nasa_training_virtual_reality_01Virtual robotic arms.

Staff could also be trained to use new machinery, even before it's physically there. This could cut down on training time, and also allow users to familiarise them selves with the machines in a very safe way.

Simulations can also be run, perhaps allowing users to experience an emergency situation. The software could be programmed to record and feed back on the users decisions, speed and alertness. The information could then be analysed, reviewed and acted upon, perhaps making the training more valuable and useful for both trainers and trainees.

The technology behind the VR headset is of course cutting edge. We haven't really seen any consumer based VR head sets before, OK there's the Samsung Gear, Google Cardboard and arguably the Oculus Rift, but with 2016 looking like it will be a bumper year for virtual reality and headset hardware we could see the use of VR rocket and become almost mainstream.

For sure, a VR headset is on our wish list for 2016 and there's quite a choice of headsets too. There's the Sony VR headset, HTC Vive and the full release of the Oculus Rift, all of which look impressive, and should in theory be around the same price range, so the choice looks like it will be down to software compatibility and personal preference.

The future of VR is looking strong, and we can't wait to become a part of it, pushing and playing with new technology whilst creating new virtual worlds and environments! We simply can't wait to get our hands on a headset, and see where we end up!

Dean

 

05/01/2016No Comments

Inspiration – Best small spaces of 2015

I've always had a thing for small spaces and buildings. For others large open spaces are brilliant, and I agree to a degree, but I think small scale architecture is really a work of art. I love the idea that no space is spared, and each area has been very cleverly designed and thought though in order to maximise the space.

small spaces outbuilding garden house room diyCosy home-made outbuilding.

So when this feature on Dwell popped-up, I thought it was worth a mention....

Most Popular Homes of 2015: Small Spaces

The article features apartments, outbuildings and floating homes, however my favourite has to be the home inside a grain silo!

house grain silo small spaces homeYou wouldn't expect a home here!

The house features all the things you'd expect in a home, bedroom, kitchen, bathroom and living areas, but the really amazing part is just how brilliant it looks, and actually how spacious it appears to be!

house grain silo small spaces home kitchen livingroom livingFantastic custom walnut and black metal kitchen and stairs!

The 190 square foot space apparently all custom made, with the Eames Wire Chairs being the only non-custom items, very impressive! The contrast between the wood and black metal work is also very nice, and it's a real credit to the owner in their boldness and design to use these dark colours without making the space feel small and claustrophobic.

house grain silo small spaces home garden outside landscapeThe beautiful landscape garden.

Overall the building is incredible in almost every sense, and the attention to detail is fantastic! It really is a unique use of a very unusual building, and perhaps we as a society and culture should embrace these structures more. The individuality in this building is what makes it what it is, so don't try to copy it, instead be inspired!

So that's a little bit of inspiration for the start of 2016! To read more about the converted grain silo home, check out the Dwell article. I'll be sure to blog more about these incredible small buildings and architecture in 2016!

Dean

 

02/11/2015No Comments

Augmented / Virtual Reality Command Centre Concept

New tech excites me, and this augmented / virtual reality project created for BAE Systems is something I'm massively impressed with. In an episode of Click, a BBC tech based show, they look at how augmented and virtual reality work in partnership to give the user a huge amount of control by immersing the user into a virtual world.

The video can be watched on the iplayer here -

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b06bbm1g/click-05092015

The command centre uses a mix of new technology, with perhaps the most recognisable tech being the Oculus Rift (the large head set), but the command centre also takes advantage of gloves, cameras, and other interfaces to allow the users to view, control and interact with the virtual world.

VR AR Command Centre Virtual Reality Augmented Reality

Mixing virtual reality with augmented reality has been used to great effect, in this case the wooden table is used not only to project the virtual world onto, but also to give the user something real to touch. I imagine it's also very useful for resting the users hands, as hovering in mid-air can soon become quite tiring.

VR AR Command Centre Virtual Reality Augmented Reality

The augmented virtual world is mainly projected onto the table, however other 3D objects are visible away from the table, such as the fighter jet, and the personal assistant.

VR AR Command Centre Virtual Reality Augmented Reality

The software developed for the command centre is perhaps the most impressive part of the project, and gives us a brief look into what's possible. In this demo the user can quickly see live video from the real world scene, but the view could view anything they need, from drawings, to written reports.

VR AR Command Centre Virtual Reality Augmented Reality

The video also glimpses at another peice of tech which I love, and that's 3D scanning. In the video the command centre can see real-time updates from 3D scanned data. Presumably the area is scanned with a drone, and the point cloud data transmitted back to the virtual world.

VR AR Command Centre Virtual Reality Augmented Reality

If you're interested in this kind of tech, watch the video, it's seriously impressive stuff! I can't wait until this kind of project becomes mainstream, and eventually the norm, until then I'll just have to keep tinkering and experimenting with my own virtual worlds!

Dean

 

19/10/20154 Comments

Udemy 3ds Max & Vray Arch Vis course coupon for FREE access

The guys over at Udemy have given me 50 free coupons to allow my lucky followers to receive this course for free!

https://www.udemy.com/intro-to-architectural-visualization-using-3ds-max-and-v-ray_zillus/#/

The course is aimed at beginners, but as always there might be some tips and tricks even the seasoned pro's might have missed.

AD15_Blog_Udemy_Course

To receive the coupon, all you need to do is subscribe to the ard Digital newsletter, and in the comments section of the sign-up form type "free course", and I will then email the coupon code to the lucky first 50 subscribers!

Dean

11/08/2015No Comments

Nice to work on local CGI projects

Usually the work I produce is from way outside Yorkshire (my current record is California!), so when projects come along that are literally just up the road it's always nice grab the project and get stuck in.

Recently I finished the 315 Bar and Restaurant project, for which I created a CGI to show the proposed development of the existing building. At the start of the project I met on site, where the work had already begun, and immediately felt I knew more about the project that just looking over drawings and sketches.

architecture_315_final_image_01_1600

Architectural visualisation of the proposed building.

The site was full with machinery, workmen, offices, but if you looked beyond this you could see the surroundings, the existing buildings, the trees and much more, which really helped when creating the final illustration. I also took a camera, shot numerous reference images, and referred back to these during the project. To match the stone texture to the existing building, I even photographed a stone wall of the building, and then re-created this to use on the 3D model.

Finally, it's also great to meet a client, via a short journey, especially when the drive is out into the lovely Yorkshire countryside on a sunny day!

I love local projects, and I'll be sure to drive out there when it's complete, even if it is just to compare the CGI to the real thing!

Dean

18/05/2012No Comments

Mobile 3D Interactive Walk Through Test 001

Recently I have been exploring the use on 3D applications on mobile devices, and the first step was to build a basic scene, and test to see how well a 3D environment would work on a small mobile phone.

This is a quick video showing the test application which uses Unity3D to create an interactive first person walk-through on a basic smart phone. The phone used was the HTC Desire S.

Surprisingly, the demo runs very well, and although the HTC Desire S that I used is only a year old, it is by no means the most powerful smart phone out there. The release of the Galaxy S3 with it's more powerful dual core processor and slightly larger screen, is likely to be perfect for this type of hand held 3D application and, I'm sure pretty intensive 3D environments can be achieved as better and faster hardware is made available.

Also what was useful to learn from this demo was the navigation, which after only a few minutes of playing, I was able to quickly navigate around the environment. It also felt very comfortable and easy to use, which is very important.

This simple test gives a quick insight into the use of 3D applications on mobile devices. This demo was by no means a finished project, but a demo to show how it works, what it looks like, and how well 3D performs on an average smart phone. It was also good to try to figure out a work-flow for this type of project. Moving from 3Ds Max, to Unity3D, then to the mobile was tricky, but relatively straight forward after some testing.

If you would like to know more about this application, or would like to try it for yourself on your Android phone, please drop me an email!

As mentioned in the video, the 3D environment was created by Marko Dabrovic and can be downloaded here hdri.cgtechniques.com/~sponza/files/

LIKE WHAT YOU SEE?

WANT TO KNOW MORE?

USEFUL LINKS

Site Map
Privacy Policy

Punch Infinity
Switch
Archive
Contact
Subscribe

INSTAGRAM FEED

instagram-image
instagram-image
instagram-image
instagram-image
instagram-image
instagram-image
instagram-image
instagram-image

PUNCH DIGITAL

Punch Digital Services Ltd

Registered Office :
Peel Walker
11 Victoria Road
Elland
HX5 0AE

Company No:
07938732

VAT No:
GB 282 4398 77